Police Spies Out of Lives is organised by and for people deceived into relationships with undercover police.

 

Police Spies Out of Lives is a campaigning support group working to achieve an end to the sexual and psychological abuse of campaigners and others by undercover police officers. We support the women affected by the issues to expose the immoral and unjustified  practice of undercover relationships, and the institutional prejudices which have led to the abuse.

Police Spies Out of Lives is organised by and for people deceived into relationships with undercover police. We were set up to support the legal action by eight women  deceived into long term intimate relationships with  undercover police officers who were infiltrating environmental and  social justice campaign groups. These women won an historic apology from the police, and the police no longer contest liability in Kate Wilson’s ongoing case. We continue to support these women in  the remainder of their legal actions, as well as through the Public Inquiry into Undercover Policing. On many of the historic pages of our website, their case is referred to as ‘the case’.

 

See also  Campaign Opposing Police Surveillance   http://campaignopposingpolicesurveillance.com/

 

Undercover officer won't face prosecution over relationship https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-46570224

 

WB&DTUC affiliated at our Feb 2019 meeting and passed the following motion which was sent to Midlands TUC and Midlansa Trades Union Council conference

 

Motion Opposing Undercover 'Political Policing'

 

This meeting notes with concern that police chiefs have admitted that undercover infiltration of political, activist and justice campaign groups in the UK has been consistent since 1968, in the form of the Special Demonstration Squad (SDS) and the National Public Order Intelligence Unit (NPOIU).

This meeting understands that a tactic of these infiltrations was for officers to form long-term intimate relationships with women activists, to bolster officer's cover identities in activist circles. Many of these 'relationships' lasted for years.

This meeting believes that this reveals that institutional sexism is endemic within the police and other state bodies that sanctioned this behaviour.

This meeting understands that police were forced to admit, in just one case so far, that they infringed upon a woman's right not to be 'subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment'. This was a violation of the women's rights to privacy, freedom of expression and freedom of association and assembly. Also this was a violation of the women's rights to a home and family life, and to privacy of communications. Further, this was an infringement of the women's right to participate in the struggle for legal, social and environmental justice.

This meeting believes that the use of sexual relationships has no place in any form of undercover policing and the Regulation Of Investigatory Powers Act (2000) should be amended to reflect this.

This meeting firmly opposes this type of political undercover policing and believe that infiltrations of this kind have no place in a democratic society.

This meeting calls for the Undercover Policing Inquiry to be extended to Scotland and Northern Ireland, and to undertake a fully transparent and truly public inquiry, providing disclosure to those whose rights have been violated by undercover operations and to fulfil its terms of reference as a means to allay public concern.

 

This meeting agrees to:

1/ share details of this motion and profile the work of Police Spies Out Of Lives in bulletins and newsletters

2/ raise awareness amongst trade unionists of undercover 'political policing', to help prevent a re-occurrence of this type of grossly intrusive policing

3/ support and publicise the demonstration by those spied upon and their supporters.